Images of the Moon by Matthew Cook
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MOON PHOTOS
Whole Moon Shots | Surface Features

Click on images to view larger version

Whole Moon Shots

Crescent Moon
Crescent Moon

The crescent moon taken with a Canon S30 camera using eyepiece projection where the camera simply takes a photo of what is in the eyepiece.

Earthshine
Earthshine

An overexposed crescent moon to show the effects of Earthshine. The darker area of the moon is lit through the Earth's light reflecting on to the moon. 3.2 sec exposure with Canon EOS400 attached directly to my telescope

5 day old moon
5 day old moon

A 5 day old moon shot taken with Canon S30 / Evostar 120 telescope (eyepiece projection)

Just over first quarter (high res)
Just over first quarter moon

At high magnification, the moon gets very interesting once it reaches half moon phase showing many craters and surface features.

6 day old moon (high res)
6 day old moon

My best eyepiece projection moon image to date with good focussing. For this reason I have uploaded the full size LARGE resolution, a stunner!

Full Moon - September 2005
Full Moon

It has to be done doesn't it. A plain old full 'harvest' moon. Taken with Canon S30 / evostar 120 scope via eyepiece projection.

10 day old moon
9 day old moon

The 9 or 10 day old moon is one of my favourite moon phases. The main reason being what's on view at high magnification. Two quite prominent crater's namely 'Plato' and 'Copernicus' are visible. Also the Alpine valley and Apennine mountain range are in full view.

   


Lunar Surface Features

Alpine Region
Alpine Region

I really should concentrate on other regions of the moon but yes I've imaged the Alpine region again. This time the moon phase was such that the shadows of the Alpine mountains look quite spectacular.

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x3 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  720x (approx)
 
 
"The Bay of Rainbows" ('Sinus Iridum')
The Bay of Rainbows

This semi-circle shaped bay and the surrounding mountains are one of the most wonderful visual features on the moon and one of the most popular amongst amateur telescope owners. The diameter at its widest point is just over 146 miles.

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x3 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  720x (approx)
Plato Crater
Plato Crater

The 67 mile wide crater Plato. This is one of the most distinctive craters on the moon with a smooth, dark basin and 'sharp' rim. This photo was taken at approx 1500x magnification.


Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 on top 3x barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  1500x (approx)
Theophilus Crater
Theophilus Crater

Theophilus is 62 miles wide and 2 miles deep featuring 3 mountain peeks at its center which rise up to 1.2 miles high.




Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 on top 3x barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  1500x (approx)
Clavius Crater
Clavius Crater

Clavius is a whopping 140 miles wide with a depth of just over 2.1 miles. Other smaller craters can be seen inside of the main crater. I took this photo at approx 500x magnification in order to fit the crater in frame.

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  480x (approx)
Copernicus Region
Copernicus Region

The 57 mile wide crater Copernicus dominates this photo. This is one of the most spectacular craters on the moon with a depth of 2.3 miles. The nearby Carpathian Mountains are to its upper left. Worth clicking this one to enlarge

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  480x (approx) per image
Plato & The Alpine Valley
Plato & The Alpine Valley

One of my favourite regions of the moon features Plato (also featured further up this page) and to its right, the Alpine Valley. Spectacular!




Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  480x (approx) per image
Giant sand snake on the Moon ?
Sand Snake on the Moon?

Well ok its not a giant snake burrowing under moon dust, but this surface feature is an interesting one to look at.


Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  480x (approx) per image
Moon mosaic - Southern Limb
Southern Limb Mosaic

This contains 2 webcam stacked images stitched together. The heavily cratered Southern Limb

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  480x (approx) per image
Moon mosaic
Moon Mosaic

This contains 4 webcam stacked images stitched together. The "chain" of 3 large craters Theophilus, Cyrillus and Catharina can be seen (middle right)

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  x2 barlow
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  480x (approx) per image
Plato Crater / Bay of Rainbows
Plato Crater / Bay of Rainbows

A webcam moon surface shot showing Plato crater (middle top) accompanied by the Alpine Valley to its right. The semi-circle shaped 'Sinus Iridum' can be seen bottom left (aka the bay of rainbows).

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  None
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  240x (approx)
Southern limb area
M13 - The Hercules Cluster

Another webcam shot this time of an area around the moons southern limb. In this shot the distinctive crater to the left is called Cassendi

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  None
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  240x (approx)
Schickard crater area
M13 - The Hercules Cluster

The 141 mile wide Schikard Crater is an impressive sight on the Southern limb of the moon. Taken with webcam / dobsonian.

Camera:  Philips ToUcam Webcam
Lenses:  None
Telescope:  Skywatcher 250px
Magnification:  240x (approx)
Shadows across Plato
Shadows across Plato

Elongated shadows of the craters rim are cast across Plato's basin. This event can only ever be seen or photographed over a period of 24 hours or so.

Plato Region
Area around Plato

The surrounding area of Plato crater including the Alpine Mountains to its right and Apennine Mountains (bottom left)
 
The straight wall
The Straight Wall

Look closely near the dark area of this photo and you'll notice a long dark line. This is the 70 mile long "straight wall". A fault line caused from a moonquake years ago